Best Multifilament Tennis Strings – Reviews, Tips, and Buying Guide

There are a lot of choices when it comes to tennis strings. Whether you’re looking for durability, power, control, or all of the above, there is a string that can fit your needs. If you’re having a hard time deciding which strings to buy, here is a list of the best multifilament strings on the market today. These strings offer great value for the price and will improve your game dramatically. So what are you waiting for? Try out one of these top-rated strings today!

What is a multifilament tennis string?

Multifilament tennis strings are made of multiple strands of material (usually nylon or Kevlar) that are twisted together. This construction gives multifilament strings a softer feel and more power than traditional synthetic gut strings. Multifilaments are also less likely to snap when strung at high tensions.

What are the benefits of using multifilament tennis strings?

Using multifilament tennis strings can provide a number of benefits, including:

– Softer feel: Multifilaments have a softer feel than synthetic gut or natural gut strings, making them more comfortable to play with.

– More power: The construction of multifilaments means that they can generate more power than other types of strings.

– Less string breakage: Multifilaments are less likely to snap when strung at high tensions, making them ideal for players who put a lot of stress on their strings.

What are the drawbacks of using multifilament tennis strings?

While multifilament tennis strings offer many benefits, there are also some drawbacks to consider, including:

– Higher price: Multifilaments tend to be more expensive than other types of strings.

– Reduced durability: The softer feel of multifilaments means that they may not last as long as other types of strings.

– Not suitable for all players: Players with arm injuries or those who prefer a stiffer string bed may not find multifilaments to be the best option.

If you’re looking for a softer-feeling string with more power, then multifilament tennis strings could be a good option for you. However, it’s important to keep in mind that they may not be suitable for all players, and they don’t tend to be as durable as other types of strings. Ultimately, it’s important to choose the type of string that best suits your individual playing style and needs.

Factors to consider before buying multifilament tennis strings

When choosing multifilament tennis strings, there are a few factors to keep in mind, including:

– String gauge:

Multifilaments are available in a range of gauges (thicknesses), so it’s important to choose the right gauge for your racket.

– String tension:

Multifilaments can be strung at higher tensions than other types of strings, so you’ll need to take this into account when choosing your string tension.

– String material:

Multifilaments are typically made of nylon or Kevlar, so it’s important to choose the right material for your needs.

– Price:

Multifilaments tend to be more expensive than other types of strings, so you’ll need to factor this into your budget.

Choosing the right multifilament tennis string can be a bit of a balancing act, but it’s important to take all of these factors into account in order to find the best string for your needs.

The Pros and Cons of Mult ifilament Tennis Strings

Multifilament tennis strings offer a number of benefits, but there are also some drawbacks to consider. Ultimately, it’s important to choose the type of string that best suits your individual playing style and needs.

Pros:

– Softer feel

– More power

– Less string breakage

Cons:

– Higher price

– Reduced durability

– Not suitable for all players

Choosing the right multifilament tennis string can be a bit of a balancing act, but it’s important to take all of these factors into account in order to find the best string for your needs.

The Best Multifilament Tennis Strings

Head Velocity MLT

Head Velocity MLT Multifilament Tennis String

As far as this list goes, Head Velocity MLT is a bit of a sleeper. Although some of the other strings on this list outperform it in certain areas, none of them strike as good a balance between quality and price.

It’s everything you’d expect from a premium multifilament with a wonderfully crisp response and above-average topspin.

Plus, it’s available in three different gauges, which include 15L (1.40 mm), 16 (1.30 mm), and 17 (1.24 mm). You’ll also get to choose between various colors, including black, blue, natural, pink, and yellow.

Head Velocity MLT is my pick for the best overall multifilament.

Tecnifibre X-One Biphase

Tecnifibre X-One Biphase Multifilament Tennis String

A long-standing favorite in the world of multifilaments, Tecnifibre makes some of the best in the business. Although it’s one of the pricier options on my list, X-One Biphase produces excellent results.

Its standout features include explosive power and comfort, while also maintaining a crisp feel. As for tension maintenance, it offers some of the best performance in this category of strings.

It comes in 16 (1.30 mm), 17 (1.24 mm), and 18 (1.18 mm) gauges. Plus, it’s available in natural and red colors.

Wilson NXT Comfort

Wilson NXT Comfort Multifilament Tennis String

Perhaps the most popular multifilament on our list, Wilson NXT Comfort, is a time-tested option that delivers the goods. You’ll pay a premium for it, but you can also expect high-end performance.

My only gripe with the string relative to its price is durability. If you like how multifilaments perform and you’re looking for a durable option, this is not the string for you. Otherwise, it’s excellent.

You can pick Wilson NXT Comfort in 16 (1.30 mm) and 17 (1.24 mm) gauge. Plus, it’s available in natural or black.

Helpful Tip: It’s worth noting they do offer Wilson DuraMax as an alternative, which provides extra durability, but in my opinion, it gives up a bit too much on the power and comfort side.

Tecnifibre NRG2

Tecnifibre NRG2 Multifilament Tennis String

A predecessor to X-One Biphase, Tecnifibre NRG2, is another long-standing favorite in the world of multifilament tennis strings.

NRG2 offers excellent power and comfort, as well as highly respectable tension maintenance. However, in my experience, better spin, and a bit less durability when compared to X-One.

It’s available in natural and black color and comes in three different gauges, which include 16 (1.32 mm), 17 (1.24 mm), and 18 (1.18 mm).

Wilson NXT Control

Wilson NXT Control Multifilament Tennis String

If you like the sound of Wilson NXT, but you’re looking for extra durability, I’d turn to NXT Control instead of NXT DuraMax.

What makes this string unique is that it blends nylon and polyester fibers to improve the string’s durability without completely sacrificing comfort. You will give up some comfort and power, but it’s a worthy option for those seeking that extra durability and, of course, control.

In some ways, it’s a bit of a niche string among the multifilament crowd, so your options are limited to its natural color and 16 guage (1.32 mm).

Although Head RIP Control has the edge in the control department, Wilson NXT Control is a close second.

Gamma TNT2 Touch

Gamma TNT2 Touch Multifilament Tennis String

Another excellent multifilament offering, Gamma TNT2 Touch, offers everything you’d expect from a premium multifilament.

Gamma’s TNT2 technology enhances the string’s elasticity and resilience for power and above-average control for a multifilament.

Of course, as you’d expect, the string still delivers high-end comfort too. Overall, it’s an excellent multifilament that’s worth checking out.

TNT2 Touch comes in 16 (1.32 mm) and 17 (1.27 mm), but you’ll only find it in its natural color.

Babolat Xcel

Babolat Excel Multifilament Tennis String

Although better known for their polyester tennis strings that pair well with their spin-friendly tennis racquets, Xcel is a multifilament offering from Babolat that’s worth checking out.

As far as features go, I give it the nod for comfort and feel, and it will work well for players looking for an arm-friendly solution but don’t want or need the extra power offered by some of the other multis on this list.

Babolat Xcel comes in three gages: 15L (1.35 mm), 16 (1.30 mm), and 17 (1.25 mm). It’s also available in natural and blue colors.

Head RIP Control

Head RIP Control Multifilament Tennis String

Although multifilaments aren’t the first you’d consider when thinking about control-centric tennis strings, Head RIP Control is a standout.

By combining nylon fibers found in most multifilaments with polyolefine ribbons, the string takes on added control and a bit extra durability while retaining reliable comfort. As you might expect, the net result is less power, which you’d desire if you were looking for control.

Head offers RIP Control in three different gauges, which include 16 (1.30 mm), 17 (1.25 mm), and 18 (1.20 mm). As for colors, it’s available in natural, orange, white, and black.

Gamma Live Wire Professional

Gama Live Wire Professional Multifilament Tennis String

Like Head Velocity MLT, Gamma Live Wire is one of the less expensive or budget-friendly multifilaments available.

It’s one of the older multifilaments on our list, but it still holds its own as an excellent option that offers the same great power, comfort, and feel you’d expect from this category of strings.

If you don’t have access to Head Velocity MLT or your stringer doesn’t carry it, but you want a string that performs at a great price, then Live Wire Professional is a fantastic option.

Gamma offers it in natural color with 16 (1.32 mm), 17 (1.27 mm), and 18 (1.22 mm) for gauges.

Solinco Vanquish

Solinco Vanquish Multifilament Tennis String

Hands down, Solinco is best known for its polyester strings, which are some of my favorites. However, Vanquish is a respect-worthy multifilament that’s high on comfort without being overbearing on power.

I find it to perform a lot like Babolat Xcel in many ways but at a fraction of the price, so worth checking out if that multifilament style appeals to you.

It’s only available in natural color, but you’ll have three gauges to choose from with 15L (1.35 mm), 16 (1.30 mm), and 17 (1.20 mm).

FAQs about Multifilament Tennis Strings

How are multifilament tennis strings different from other types of strings?

Multifilament tennis strings are made up of multiple strands of material, usually nylon, which are twisted together to form the string. This construction gives multifilament strings a softer feel than other types of strings, and also makes them more resistant to breaking.

What are the drawbacks of using multifilament strings?

Multifilament strings can lose their tension more quickly than other types of strings, and they are also more susceptible to moisture damage. This means that they may need to be replaced more often than other types of strings.

How should I string my racket if I want to use multifilament strings?

When stringing a racket with multifilament strings, it is important to use a lower tension than you would use with other types of strings. This will help to prolong the life of the string and prevent it from breaking prematurely. It is also important to avoid using too much pressure when installing the string, as this can damage the string.

Are multifilament tennis strings good for beginners?

Yes, multifilament strings are a good choice for beginners. The increased comfort and resiliency of the string can make the game more enjoyable for those just starting out, and the lower tension required means that it is easier to get the racket strung correctly.

Do professional players use multifilament strings?

Many professional players do use multifilament strings, particularly in their practice rackets. The soft feel and added resiliency of the string can help to reduce arm fatigue, and the good ball control and spin potential can be beneficial during training sessions. However, not all professionals use multifilament strings in their competition rackets, as they may prefer the slightly higher tension and durability of other types of strings.

Do multifilament strings lose tension quickly?

Multifilament strings can lose tension more quickly than other types of strings, so they may need to be replaced more often. However, the precise amount of tension loss will vary depending on the string material, construction, and gauge.

What is the best way to store multifilament tennis strings?

Multifilament strings should be stored in a cool, dry place. Avoid exposing them to excessive heat or humidity, as this can damage the string. It is also important to keep them away from sharp objects, as the strands can be easily cut or frayed.

How long do multifilament strings last?

The lifespan of a multifilament string will depend on a number of factors, including the type of string, the string tension, and how often the racket is used. Generally, multifilament strings will need to be replaced more frequently than other types of strings.

What are some popular brands of multifilament tennis strings?

Some popular brands of multifilament tennis strings include Babolat VS Touch, Wilson NXT, and Prince Synthetic Gut. There are many other brands available, so be sure to do some research to find the string that best suits your needs.

What is the most durable multifilament string?

There is no definitive answer to this question, as the durability of a multifilament string will depend on a number of factors, including the type of string, the string tension, and how often the racket is used. However, some brands that are known for their durable strings include Babolat VS Touch and Wilson NXT.

How much does a multifilament string job cost?

The cost of a multifilament string job will vary depending on the brand and type of string used, as well as the tension that you choose. Generally speaking, you can expect to pay anywhere from $20 to $60 for a quality multifilament string job.

Conclusion

If you are in the market for a new set of tennis strings, we highly recommend giving best multifilament strings a try. They offer great playability and feel, and they can help you to take your game to the next level. We’ve highlighted some of our favorite multifilament strings in this post, so be sure to check them out and see which one is right for you. Thanks for reading, and happy hitting!

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